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28 May 2017 01:29AM

Future Textile Road Forum

25 Apr 17 ,  Corporated News
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The future of the new textile industry: a dialogue between Xinjiang, China and Europe

Logistics/Suppy Chain
  • China's vision of a 21st century 'Maritime Silk Road' is vital to Asean

    07 Oct 14 ,  Logistics/Suppy Chain
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    One of the main themes at the recent China-Asean Expo set in motion in the capital of Guangxi was the new Maritime Silk Road, a vision put forward by President Xi Jinping in late 2013 to revive the ancient maritime trade and cultural routes between China and its western neighbours, other Central Asian countries, and the Arab world. This grand policy marks a new era of Chinese policy engagement with Asean.

    One of the main themes at the recent China-Asean Expo set in motion in the capital of Guangxi was the new Maritime Silk Road, a vision put forward by President Xi Jinping in late 2013 to revive the ancient maritime trade and cultural routes between China and its western neighbours, other Central Asian countries, and the Arab world. This grand policy marks a new era of Chinese policy engagement with Asean.

     

    We see this "21st century Maritime Silk Road" as not just another policy slogan by the Chinese government to rebalance its geopolitical power with the West, but also as a much-needed economic upgrading as the current super growth cycle in China has run its course. As China becomes more integrated with its western neighbours, Asean businesses stand to enjoy access to China's vast markets both in and outside the middle Kingdom.

     

    There has been little discussion about the notion of the new Maritime Silk Road in Thailand. Let's first understand what President Xi's proposal to jointly build the New Silk Road Economic Belt is all about. The concept is to strengthen relations between China, Central Asia, and Europe, through five forms of connectivity: policy communication, road connections, trade facilitation, monetary cooperation, and cultural exchanges.

     

    The proposals may have appeared vague at the beginning, but we are now seeing evidence of this policy initiative turning into tangible actions, while putting the geopolitical debate aside. In China, for example, a 10-billion-yuan fund has been set up to support infrastructure construction in countries such as Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh, under the umbrella of the Silk Road plan.

     

    In addition, Chinese coastal provinces from Shanghai to Guangxi have all embraced the ambition to claim a spot in the new Maritime Silk Road. Most notable is Guangxi, where the annual China-Asean Expo is held every September. A "Nanning Channel" has been established to serve as a key connector for China-Asean cooperation.

     

    Varying degrees of progress can also be seen in other developments, including two China-Malaysia Industrial Parks, the China-Indonesia Economic Cooperation Zone, the China-Cambodia Modern Agriculture Experiment Centre, the China-Thailand Industrial Park, and the China-Vietnam Cross Border Economic Cooperation Zone.

     

    A large-scale Guangxi Beibu Gulf Economic Zone covering 40,000 square kilometres is another major project that has long been under development to enhance maritime links between southwestern China and the region.

     

    At a broader level, the Chinese government's proposal to set up an Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank earlier this year is a step that we believe will enhance the regional connectivity central to the concept of the new Maritime Silk Road policy. The bank reportedly will have initial capital of $5-10 billion.

     

    Looking ahead, the Shanghai-style Free Trade Zone will be replicated in other areas throughout the country. Certain cities in Guangxi or Yunnan provinces will in the foreseeable future gain free trade zone status that will be meaningful to the upgraded China-Asean trade vision, which envisages bilateral trade turnover growing to $1 trillion by 2020.

     

    We expect the use of yuan for trade settlement and payment will increase exponentially, with more yuan liquidity to be provided by Chinese authorities, as well as channels for two-way yuan investment opening up.

     

    The trend for outward direct investment (ODI) from China is irreversible. At present, Asean makes up a relatively small 6% of total ODI from China, despite China being the country's largest trading partner. We expect Asean will become more relevant to Chinese enterprises as intraregional trade and transport networks become more integrated.

     

    The rationale for Chinese ODI will also shift from resource- and cost-driven to market-driven while growth in China slows down. This means that we will see larger and more highly competitive Chinese enterprises venturing abroad, opening up new market opportunities to Asean businesses that are ready to compete in the new environment.

     

     

    Source: http://www.bangkokpost.com/business/news/436137/china-vision-of-a-21st-century-maritime-silk-road-is-vital-to-asean

  • GEM Textile To Roll Out Kewill Warehouse Solution

    07 Sep 12 ,  Logistics/Suppy Chain
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    GEM Textile has signed a multi-year agreement to implement the well-proven Kewill Warehouse solution. Based in Manchester, GEM Textile is a major wholesale distributer supplying the retail trade with household textiles. GEM Textile has been in operation for over 30 years and supplies several of the major retail brands in the UK.

  • Import-export slowdown hit logistics

    04 May 12 ,  Logistics/Suppy Chain
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    Import-export order slump has led to a drop in contract volume of local logistics firms.

  • Lat Krabang estate holds the key to exports

    15 Nov 11 ,  Logistics/Suppy Chain
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    In the worst-case scenario, the food-supply chain and exports would be paralysed if industrial estates - particularly Lat Krabang and Mahachai Market - have to close down due to severe flooding.

  • Vietnam's supply chain reform agenda

    21 Sep 11 ,  Logistics/Suppy Chain
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    Vietnam is one of the world's fastest-growing sourcing and manufacturing locations _ with an average export growth rate that was the highest in the region during the last decade. With its increasing international focus, the booming economy of Vietnam has become a focal point for offshore production by global manufacturers looking for even lower-cost locations than previously offered in China.

  • ISM non-manufacturing data shows growth for the 21st straight month

    07 Sep 11 ,  Logistics/Suppy Chain
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    Aswas the case in July, the August edition of the Institute for Supply Management’s (ISM) Non-Manufacturing Report on Business outperformed its sister report focused on manufacturing.

  • China's GDP growth could dip under 9%

    07 Sep 11 ,  Logistics/Suppy Chain
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    The growth rate of China's economy is likely to fall below 9 percent next year, pulled down by the deteriorating economic momentum of the largest developed countries, a senior currency regulation official said on Tuesday.