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25 May 2017 10:58AM

Future Textile Road Forum

25 Apr 17 ,  Corporated News
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The future of the new textile industry: a dialogue between Xinjiang, China and Europe

Fabrics
  • The Dyneema® Project develops a revolutionary alpine jacket

    13 Jan 17 ,  Fabrics
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    The Netherlands, 12 January 2017 – Acclaimed technical apparel designer Conroy Nachtigall was commissioned by The Dyneema® Project to develop an alpine jacket of tomorrow with Dyneema® Composite Fabric. The short documentary ‘Sending It’ covers the “Wow!” response when the jacket – the strongest and lightest ever made – is tried by some of the big names living in Canadian extreme sports capital Squamish.

  • DYNEEMA® Denim Now Passes Impact Abrasion Test

    18 Oct 16 ,  Fabrics
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    The Netherlands, 11 October 2016 – The future is here: the latest version of Dyneema® Denim can be applied to single-layer motorcycle clothing and passes the standard impact abrasion test – without sacrificing the comfort and style of traditional denim and without the need for an extra lining

  • Contrast Clip Georgette

    08 Feb 16 ,  Fabrics
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    Polyester (PET) georgette (sheer woven fabric with a matte or grainy surface) with a woven dot pattern. This textile features a different color on each face, though constructed in one single layer. Traditionally, piece dyeing (dyeing a fabricated textile rather than the yarns before construction) creates color deposition through the entire product resulting in both sides being the same in color. This technique however allows for controlled penetration of the dyestuff through only ½ of the textile’s thickness. The dyeing process has significant reductions in energy demand (86% reduction), global warming potential (gas reduction 84%) and water consumption (95% reduction) over wet dye processes. Also, there is no variation between dye lots. The dyeing and printing technique used to apply the color is waterless, using air to convey the dyestuff to the fabric, eliminating wastewater. Water use in traditional textile dyeing and finishing is particularly high, 7 to 75 gallons of water per pound of fabric. This process begins with a “donor” paper, which houses the dye before transferring it to the textile. The “donor” paper can be directly printed with any number of colors or patterns, eliminating the requirement for high volume production and allowing for customization and small minimums. After the dye is transferred to the textile, no post-treatments, washes or finishing is needed. The “donor” paper can be recycled. Colors are fully customizable on both faces including the printing of patterns as well as solid colors. Multiple combinations of color and print are possible including: a single color both sides, 2 sided 2 color, print/solid color, or 2 sided 2 print. The bonding of the dye through thickness promotes resistance to fading in reaction to cleaning agents. Applications include apparel, draperies and accessories.

    Polyester (PET) georgette (sheer woven fabric with a matte or grainy surface) with a woven dot pattern. This textile features a different color on each face, though constructed in one single layer. Traditionally, piece dyeing (dyeing a fabricated textile rather than the yarns before construction) creates color deposition through the entire product resulting in both sides being the same in color.

  • Cotton’s First Full Traceability System

    27 Jan 16 ,  Fabrics
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    BREMEN, Germany — January 20, 2016 — ICA Bremen — the international center for cotton testing, research and quality training — is working with some of the biggest names in the industry to be the first to develop a full traceability system.

    BREMEN, Germany — January 20, 2016 — ICA Bremen — the international center for cotton testing, research and quality training — is working with some of the biggest names in the industry to be the first to develop a full traceability system.

  • Steel Warp Knit, Applications include fashion, fire-protective clothing

    25 Dec 15 ,  Fabrics
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    Warp knit textile composed of stainless steel fibers. The fabric is non-flammable, extremely heat resistant (melting point 1510°C or 2750°F), and inherently anti-bacterial. Knitted on a Raschel knitting machine, the fabric is strong, flexible, and resists fraying and unraveling. The material is naturally light grey in color, custom colors are not possible. The dtex (linear density) of the yarn can be adjusted, so too the tulle structure, however any changes would need to be tested to guarantee the final properties. This material is Class A1 non-flammable according to DIN 4102 (German Standard); and the manufacturer is ISO9001 and 14001 certified, and REACH compliant. Applications include fashion, interior decoration, fire-protective clothing, doors and walls, and as reinforcement in composites.
    For more information Tel. 02-664-8448 or www.materialconnexion.com/th

    Warp knit textile composed of stainless steel fibers. The fabric is non-flammable, extremely heat resistant (melting point 1510°C or 2750°F), and inherently anti-bacterial.

  • NOVOLINO™ Nonwoven, The first nonwoven for tabletop applications

    25 Dec 15 ,  Fabrics
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    Disposable, nonwoven textile composed of 60% wood pulp, 25% polypropylene (PP) and 15% polyester (PES). The first nonwoven that bridges the gap between traditional airlaid nonwoven and linen for tabletop applications. It combines softness, quality and disposability. The synthetic layer protects diners’ dark clothing from fiber linting. It ensures consistency of color and hygiene and guarantees a clean, fresh napkin every time.
It allows for many design variations, offering flexibility of color and design. The nonwoven is produced in a composite process and the material is then converted into consumer and food service items. FSC and FDA certification is underway on this product. Applications include napkins, tablecovers, runners (in both restaurant and residential environments) and airline (headrest covers and a disposable alternative for high-end sleeping products in First and Business class).

    Disposable, nonwoven textile composed of 60% wood pulp, 25% polypropylene (PP) and 15% polyester (PES).

  • Norafin Ecoline® flax material

    25 Dec 15 ,  Fabrics
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    Durable, spun-lace nonwoven flexible fabrics composed of flax fibers. They are lightweight, tear-resistant and flexible. Flax fibers offer the greatest stiffness to the weight of any of the currently used natural fibers, and compare favorably to glass fiber in this regard. The fabrics also offer non-allergenic, thermo-regulating, vibration damping features. To produce the fabrics, the flax fibers are opened, a carded web is formed and subsequently the web is entangled through the spun-lacing process. The basic principle of the spun-lacing process consists of passing a web beneath a series of high pressure, small diameter water jets. As the web passes beneath the water jets, the water jets penetrate through the material, and rebound back due to the support element, this combined action causing the individual fibers to become entangled together to form a dimensionally stable product. They have an inherent UV resistance. It can be readily customized including: Flat, aperture, patterned, three-dimensional structures, scrim reinforced, prints, surface coatings, colored, multiple after-treatment options providing added-value performance. Applications include interior design, home furnishings, composites, sports and leisure activities, wind turbines and roofing.

    Durable, spun-lace nonwoven flexible fabrics composed of flax fibers. They are lightweight, tear-resistant and flexible. Flax fibers offer the greatest stiffness to the weight of any of the currently used natural fibers, and compare favorably to glass fiber in this regard.

  • Japanese-inspired shoes that wrap around your feet

    26 Aug 15 ,  Fabrics
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    Store bought shoes rarely fit perfectly, and bespoke options are too expensive for many. Italian shoe maker Vibram, more commonly known for its military footwear, has come up with a solution to this problem with its Furoshiki Shoes.
    Furoshiki (風呂敷) are a traditional Japanese wrapping cloth used for transporting goods and were first used in the Edo period to carry clothing while at the public baths. Furoshiki shoes, created by Japanese designer Masaya Hashimoto, have no laces and instead wrap around the foot–hence the name–fastening with velcro.
    Vibram calls it the first ever “wrapping sole.” These novel shoes can be bought from the Japanese Vibram store for about $140 USD, and come in at least five colors.

    Store bought shoes rarely fit perfectly, and bespoke options are too expensive for many. Italian shoe maker Vibram, more commonly known for its military footwear, has come up with a solution to this problem with its Furoshiki Shoes.

  • The Changing World Of Fabric Printing

    07 Aug 15 ,  Fabrics
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    Printing is one of the oldest methods to change the appearance of a fabric and to enhance its value. From printing with wooden blocks, over rotary and screen printing, the industry more recently arrived at digital printing. The expression “digital printing” is based on the technique of printing a design directly on a substrate; in the beginning, it was only paper printing that derived from desktop publishing. That seems to be a long time ago. Digital printing has higher costs per page than more traditional offset printing methods; however, this price is usually offset because digital technology avoids the cost of all the technical steps required to make printing plates, including waste water, preparation, screens, etc. Not to forget about shorter production time cycles, and the ability to run small lots.

    Printing is one of the oldest methods to change the appearance of a fabric and to enhance its value. From printing with wooden blocks, over rotary and screen printing, the industry more recently arrived at digital printing. The expression “digital printing” is based on the technique of printing a design directly on a substrate; in the beginning, it was only paper printing that derived from desktop publishing. That seems to be a long time ago. Digital printing has higher costs per page than more traditional offset printing methods; however, this price is usually offset because digital technology avoids the cost of all the technical steps required to make printing plates, including waste water, preparation, screens, etc. Not to forget about shorter production time cycles, and the ability to run small lots.

  • New Materials for textile industry

    11 Dec 14 ,  Fabrics
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    New Materials.  In this column, TTIS Textile Digest compiles articles by the Material ConneXion® Bangkok to show case materials for textile industry from local and overseas sources.  The goal is to update local industry community to the fast changing trend and progress in material uses in this field- the new development, the pros and cons of using these materials in various end-uses.  In this issue, we are happy to present 4 cases from overseas.