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30 March 2017 05:02AM

Green Dyeing Technology and Sustainable Chemistry

18 Dec 16 ,  ttistextiledigest
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News in the advancement of dyeing and finishing technology published in this issue consist of (1) Green Dyeing Technology (2) New hydrophilic softener for textile finishing (3) New finishing and testing solutions for pollen management on textile surfaces and (4) CadiraTM concept for saving valuable resources.
Green Dyeing Technology
It has been known that the textile dyeing process requires large amounts of water for the process and creates a lot of toxic effluents coming from auxiliaries and dyestuffs which are not fully bound to the textile goods and those left from the process discarded as wastewater and toxic chemicals. Therefore, a team of scientists from the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences investigates an innovative and environmentally friendly textile dyeing technology by using nanocellulose fibers to reduce amount of wastewater and toxic chemicals. This team's project has won the first prize in inaugural Green and Sustainable Chemistry Challenge at the Green and Sustainable Chemistry Conference in Berlin. This green textile dyeing technology involves using cellulose to dye materials. During homogenization process, cellulose is converted into a hydrogel material consisting of nanocellulose fibers having 70 times more surface area than those of cotton fibers. This nanocellulose hydrogel material having high surface areas with high reactivity allows to uptake and attach more dye molecules. After that, dyed nanocellulose hydrogels are transferred to a textile by a conventional printing method. (Source: www.fibre2fashion.com)
New hydrophilic softener for textile finishing from Wacker
Wacker has launched a new product of hydrophilic fabric softener to improve the softness of textile and remain absorbent at the same time after finishing, called “WETSOFT NE 750”. The main constituents of “WETSOFT NE 750” are block copolymers based on aminofunctional silicones and polyglycol. The silicone segments arrange themselves in free-moving loop on the outside of the fabric and reduce friction between the fibers providing the softness on the treated fabrics. While the polyglycol segments remain permeable to water. “WETSOFT NE 750” offers significant advantages for making product formulation easily. “WETSOFT NE 750” is marketed as a water-free concentrate with high solid content. This hydrophilic fabric softener is self-emulsifying and can be diluted with water in a ratio of 1:1 to 1:5 to form a stable emulsion. Both cotton and cotton blended polyester fabrics can be finished with this product by either exhaust or padding method. (Sources: www.innovationintextiles.com and www. Fibre2fashion.com)
New finishing and testing solutions for pollen management on textile surfaces
Nowadays there have no effective textile protection for people allergic to pollen. In Germany, about one in six of population suffers from hay fever caused by pollen from trees, shrubs, gasses and crops. Pollen adheres readily to clothing or domestic textiles, such as curtain, sofas, carpet and bedding. After adhering, pollen finds its way through the respiratory system into the body where it triggers allergic symptoms in people who are over-sensitive to pollen. Scientists at CHT R. Beitlich GmbH have developed two special anti-pollen textile finishing treatments. The two biofunctional finishes work in opposite ways either repels or binds pollen on the textile surface. For example, clothing may have pollen-repellent properties in order to reduce the amount of pollen brought into the home after a walk in springtime. In contrast, the domestic textiles like sofas, carpets and curtains should have a pollen-binding effect in order to keep the troublesome allergens far away from the allergy sufferer. For pollen adhesion/repellence testing, the Hohenstein scientists have developed a test set up for pollen adhesion/repellence in the laboratory by simulating the flight of pollen and also studying how pollen adheres to textiles. The aim of this testing method is to help scientists to assess the ability of textile finish to absorb pollen, retain it or deliberately release it accurately. (Sources: www.hohenstein.de และ www. Innovationintextiles.com)

News in the advancement of dyeing and finishing technology published in this issue consist of (1) Green Dyeing Technology (2) New hydrophilic softener for textile finishing (3) New finishing and testing solutions for pollen management on textile surfaces

 

Green Dyeing Technology

 

GreenandSustainable

 

It has been known that the textile dyeing process requires large amounts of water for the process and creates a lot of toxic effluents coming from auxiliaries and dyestuffs which are not fully bound to the textile goods and those left from the process discarded as wastewater and toxic chemicals. Therefore, a team of scientists from the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences investigates an innovative and environmentally friendly textile dyeing technology by using nanocellulose fibers to reduce amount of wastewater and toxic chemicals. This team's project has won the first prize in inaugural Green and Sustainable Chemistry Challenge at the Green and Sustainable Chemistry Conference in Berlin. This green textile dyeing technology involves using cellulose to dye materials. During homogenization process, cellulose is converted into a hydrogel material consisting of nanocellulose fibers having 70 times more surface area than those of cotton fibers. This nanocellulose hydrogel material having high surface areas with high reactivity allows to uptake and attach more dye molecules. After that, dyed nanocellulose hydrogels are transferred to a textile by a conventional printing method. (Source: www.fibre2fashion.com)

 

 

New hydrophilic softener for textile finishing from Wacker

 

WETSOFT

 

Wacker has launched a new product of hydrophilic fabric softener to improve the softness of textile and remain absorbent at the same time after finishing, called “WETSOFT NE 750”. The main constituents of “WETSOFT NE 750” are block copolymers based on aminofunctional silicones and polyglycol. The silicone segments arrange themselves in free-moving loop on the outside of the fabric and reduce friction between the fibers providing the softness on the treated fabrics. While the polyglycol segments remain permeable to water. “WETSOFT NE 750” offers significant advantages for making product formulation easily. “WETSOFT NE 750” is marketed as a water-free concentrate with high solid content. This hydrophilic fabric softener is self-emulsifying and can be diluted with water in a ratio of 1:1 to 1:5 to form a stable emulsion. Both cotton and cotton blended polyester fabrics can be finished with this product by either exhaust or padding method. (Sources: www.innovationintextiles.com and www. Fibre2fashion.com)

 

New finishing and testing solutions for pollen management on textile surfaces

 

Nowadays there have no effective textile protection for people allergic to pollen. In Germany, about one in six of population suffers from hay fever caused by pollen from trees, shrubs, gasses and crops. Pollen adheres readily to clothing or domestic textiles, such as curtain, sofas, carpet and bedding. After adhering, pollen finds its way through the respiratory system into the body where it triggers allergic symptoms in people who are over-sensitive to pollen. Scientists at CHT R. Beitlich GmbH have developed two special anti-pollen textile finishing treatments. The two biofunctional finishes work in opposite ways either repels or binds pollen on the textile surface. For example, clothing may have pollen-repellent properties in order to reduce the amount of pollen brought into the home after a walk in springtime. In contrast, the domestic textiles like sofas, carpets and curtains should have a pollen-binding effect in order to keep the troublesome allergens far away from the allergy sufferer. For pollen adhesion/repellence testing, the Hohenstein scientists have developed a test set up for pollen adhesion/repellence in the laboratory by simulating the flight of pollen and also studying how pollen adheres to textiles. The aim of this testing method is to help scientists to assess the ability of textile finish to absorb pollen, retain it or deliberately release it accurately. (Sources: www.hohenstein.de และ www. Innovationintextiles.com)

 

Sirawan Kittinaovarut